Discussion:
[PATCH] hwmon: LM96000 support
(too old to reply)
Jean Delvare
2008-10-02 12:22:17 UTC
Permalink
Hi Herbert,

Wrong mailing list, redirecting to the correct one.
this patch adds proper support for LM96000 (at least
the version I could test with) and provides some
'generic' control of the tachometer monitor mode for
lm85/lm96000 pwm control.
Ideally this would be 2 separate patches.
please consider for (mainline) inclusion!
TIA,
Herbert
Signed-off-by: Herbert Poetzl <herbert at 13thfloor.at>
diff -NurpP --minimal linux-2.6.27-rc8-khali/Documentation/hwmon/lm85 linux-2.6.27-rc8-khali-lm96k-v0.1/Documentation/hwmon/lm85
--- linux-2.6.27-rc8-khali/Documentation/hwmon/lm85 2008-10-01 19:39:51.000000000 +0200
+++ linux-2.6.27-rc8-khali-lm96k-v0.1/Documentation/hwmon/lm85 2008-10-01 20:39:01.000000000 +0200
-1 PWM always 100% (full on)
-2 Manual control (write to 'pwm#' to set)
+* PWM Tachometer Monitor Mode
You could add that this applies to the LM85 and LM96000 only.
+
+* pwm#_tmm - controls the monitor mode for pwm#
I'm not convinced that this is the correct name. These registers mainly
affect the fan speed measurement, not control (thus the name:
Tachometer Monitor Mode), even though mode 2 will have an effect on the
PWM duty cycle as well. So, shouldn't these files be rather named
fan#_tmm?
+
+
+ Value Meaning <min
+ ------ ---------------------------------------- ------
+ 0 Traditional tach input monitor any
+ 1 Traditional tach input monitor FFFFh
+ 2 Most accurate readings FFFFh
+ 3 Least effect on programmed PWM of Fan FFFFh
+
+In the default setting, you will get false readings when under
+minimum detctable RPM, in all other modes FFFFh.
Mode 0 seems a bit silly to me. Shouldn't we automatically switch the
chip to mode 1 when we find it in mode 0 (and high-frequency PWM isn't
in use)?
+
The National LM85's have two vendor specific configuration
features. Tach. mode and Spinup Control. For more details on these,
see the LM85 datasheet or Application Note AN-1260. These features
Later on, the document says that the tachometer mode isn't supported by
the driver. You should change this, as it is now.
diff -NurpP --minimal linux-2.6.27-rc8-khali/drivers/hwmon/lm85.c linux-2.6.27-rc8-khali-lm96k-v0.1/drivers/hwmon/lm85.c
--- linux-2.6.27-rc8-khali/drivers/hwmon/lm85.c 2008-10-01 19:39:51.000000000 +0200
+++ linux-2.6.27-rc8-khali-lm96k-v0.1/drivers/hwmon/lm85.c 2008-10-01 20:29:25.000000000 +0200
@@ -39,7 +39,8 @@
static const unsigned short normal_i2c[] = { 0x2c, 0x2d, 0x2e, I2C_CLIENT_END };
/* Insmod parameters */
-I2C_CLIENT_INSMOD_6(lm85b, lm85c, adm1027, adt7463, emc6d100, emc6d102);
+I2C_CLIENT_INSMOD_7(lm85b, lm85c, lm96000, adm1027, adt7463, emc6d100,
+ emc6d102);
/* The LM85 registers */
@@ -67,6 +68,7 @@ I2C_CLIENT_INSMOD_6(lm85b, lm85c, adm102
#define LM85_VERSTEP_GENERIC 0x60
#define LM85_VERSTEP_LM85C 0x60
#define LM85_VERSTEP_LM85B 0x62
+#define LM85_VERSTEP_LM96000 0x69
What about 0x68? We've seen LM96000 chips with this device ID already,
so we should support it.
#define LM85_VERSTEP_ADM1027 0x60
#define LM85_VERSTEP_ADT7463 0x62
#define LM85_VERSTEP_ADT7463C 0x6A
@@ -91,6 +93,8 @@ I2C_CLIENT_INSMOD_6(lm85b, lm85c, adm102
#define LM85_REG_AFAN_HYST1 0x6d
#define LM85_REG_AFAN_HYST2 0x6e
+#define LM85_REG_TACHO_MON_MODE 0x74
+
#define ADM1027_REG_EXTEND_ADC1 0x76
#define ADM1027_REG_EXTEND_ADC2 0x77
@@ -185,11 +189,16 @@ static int RANGE_TO_REG(int range)
#define RANGE_FROM_REG(val) lm85_range_map[(val) & 0x0f]
/* These are the PWM frequency encodings */
-static const int lm85_freq_map[8] = { /* 1 Hz */
- 10, 15, 23, 30, 38, 47, 62, 94
Note: this 62 should actually be 61, as you did for the LM96000. I've
fixed it in my code.
+static const int lm85_freq_map[] = { /* 1 Hz */
+ 10, 15, 23, 30, 38, 47, 62, 94, 0
};
-static const int adm1027_freq_map[8] = { /* 1 Hz */
- 11, 15, 22, 29, 35, 44, 59, 88
+static const int lm96000_freq_map[] = { /* 1 Hz */
+ 10, 15, 23, 30, 38, 47, 61, 94,
+ 22500, 24000, 25700, 25700,
+ 27700, 27700, 30000, 30000, 0
+};
+static const int adm1027_freq_map[] = { /* 1 Hz */
+ 11, 15, 22, 29, 35, 44, 59, 88, 0
};
static int FREQ_TO_REG(const int *map, int freq)
@@ -197,7 +206,7 @@ static int FREQ_TO_REG(const int *map, i
int i;
/* Find the closest match */
- for (i = 0; i < 7; ++i)
+ for (i = 0; map[i + 1]; i++)
if (freq <= (map[i] + map[i + 1]) / 2)
break;
return i;
@@ -205,7 +214,13 @@ static int FREQ_TO_REG(const int *map, i
static int FREQ_FROM_REG(const int *map, u8 reg)
{
- return map[reg & 0x07];
Note that the masking wasn't needed, as it already happens in
lm85_update_device().
+ int i;
+
+ for (i = 0; map[i]; i++)
+ if (reg == i)
+ break;
+
+ return map[i];
}
You are replacing an algorithm in constant time (O(1)) by a linear one
(O(N)). This is no good, and can easily be avoided. You simply need to
ensure that the value of "reg" is suitable for the map's size, this can
be done by a simple masking in lm85_update_device().
/* Since we can't use strings, I'm abusing these numbers
@@ -304,6 +319,7 @@ struct lm85_data {
u8 temp_ext[3]; /* Decoded values */
u8 in_ext[8]; /* Decoded values */
u8 vid; /* Register value */
+ u8 tmm; /* Register value */
u8 vrm; /* VRM version */
u32 alarms; /* Register encoding, combined */
struct lm85_autofan autofan[3];
@@ -327,6 +343,7 @@ static const struct i2c_device_id lm85_i
{ "lm85", any_chip },
{ "lm85b", lm85b },
{ "lm85c", lm85c },
+ { "lm96000", lm96000 },
{ "emc6d100", emc6d100 },
{ "emc6d101", emc6d100 },
{ "emc6d102", emc6d102 },
@@ -567,7 +584,31 @@ static ssize_t set_pwm_freq(struct devic
data->pwm_freq[nr] = FREQ_TO_REG(data->freq_map, val);
lm85_write_value(client, LM85_REG_AFAN_RANGE(nr),
(data->zone[nr].range << 4)
- | data->pwm_freq[nr]);
+ | (data->pwm_freq[nr] & 0x0f));
Useless masking.
+ mutex_unlock(&data->update_lock);
+ return count;
+}
+
+static ssize_t show_pwm_tmm(struct device *dev,
+ struct device_attribute *attr, char *buf)
+{
+ int nr = to_sensor_dev_attr(attr)->index;
+ struct lm85_data *data = lm85_update_device(dev);
+ return sprintf(buf, "%d\n", (data->tmm >> (2*nr)) & 3);
+}
+
+static ssize_t set_pwm_tmm(struct device *dev,
+ struct device_attribute *attr, const char *buf, size_t count)
+{
+ int nr = to_sensor_dev_attr(attr)->index;
+ struct i2c_client *client = to_i2c_client(dev);
+ struct lm85_data *data = i2c_get_clientdata(client);
+ long val = simple_strtol(buf, NULL, 10);
+ int mask = 3 << (2*nr);
You should reject invalid values at this point.

BTW, the datasheet says that only mode 0 is valid for high frequency
PWM modes. So I guess that the driver should enforce that, by forcing
mode 0 and preventing non-zero values from being written when a high
frequency is selected?
+
+ mutex_lock(&data->update_lock);
+ data->tmm = (data->tmm & ~mask) | ((val & 3) << (2*nr));
+ lm85_write_value(client, LM85_REG_TACHO_MON_MODE, data->tmm);
mutex_unlock(&data->update_lock);
return count;
}
@@ -578,7 +619,9 @@ static SENSOR_DEVICE_ATTR(pwm##offset, S
static SENSOR_DEVICE_ATTR(pwm##offset##_enable, S_IRUGO | S_IWUSR, \
show_pwm_enable, set_pwm_enable, offset - 1); \
static SENSOR_DEVICE_ATTR(pwm##offset##_freq, S_IRUGO | S_IWUSR, \
- show_pwm_freq, set_pwm_freq, offset - 1)
+ show_pwm_freq, set_pwm_freq, offset - 1); \
+static SENSOR_DEVICE_ATTR(pwm##offset##_tmm, S_IRUGO | S_IWUSR, \
+ show_pwm_tmm, set_pwm_tmm, offset - 1)
show_pwm_reg(1);
@@ -886,7 +929,7 @@ static ssize_t set_temp_auto_temp_min(st
TEMP_FROM_REG(data->zone[nr].limit));
lm85_write_value(client, LM85_REG_AFAN_RANGE(nr),
((data->zone[nr].range & 0x0f) << 4)
- | (data->pwm_freq[nr] & 0x07));
+ | (data->pwm_freq[nr] & 0x0f));
You might as well drop the masking altogether, it's useless.
/* Update temp_auto_hyst and temp_auto_off */
data->zone[nr].hyst = HYST_TO_REG(TEMP_FROM_REG(
@@ -929,7 +972,7 @@ static ssize_t set_temp_auto_temp_max(st
val - min);
lm85_write_value(client, LM85_REG_AFAN_RANGE(nr),
((data->zone[nr].range & 0x0f) << 4)
- | (data->pwm_freq[nr] & 0x07));
+ | (data->pwm_freq[nr] & 0x0f));
Same here.
mutex_unlock(&data->update_lock);
return count;
}
@@ -999,6 +1042,9 @@ static struct attribute *lm85_attributes
&sensor_dev_attr_pwm1_freq.dev_attr.attr,
&sensor_dev_attr_pwm2_freq.dev_attr.attr,
&sensor_dev_attr_pwm3_freq.dev_attr.attr,
+ &sensor_dev_attr_pwm1_tmm.dev_attr.attr,
+ &sensor_dev_attr_pwm2_tmm.dev_attr.attr,
+ &sensor_dev_attr_pwm3_tmm.dev_attr.attr,
&sensor_dev_attr_in0_input.dev_attr.attr,
&sensor_dev_attr_in1_input.dev_attr.attr,
@@ -1145,6 +1191,9 @@ static int lm85_detect(struct i2c_client
kind = lm85b;
break;
+ kind = lm96000;
+ break;
}
} else if (company == LM85_COMPANY_ANALOG_DEV) {
switch (verstep) {
@@ -1193,6 +1242,9 @@ static int lm85_detect(struct i2c_client
type_name = "lm85c";
break;
+ type_name = "lm96000";
+ break;
type_name = "adm1027";
break;
@@ -1237,6 +1289,9 @@ static int lm85_probe(struct i2c_client
data->freq_map = adm1027_freq_map;
break;
+ data->freq_map = lm96000_freq_map;
+ break;
data->freq_map = lm85_freq_map;
}
@@ -1401,6 +1456,9 @@ static struct lm85_data *lm85_update_dev
lm85_read_value(client, LM85_REG_PWM(i));
}
+ /* maybe restrict to LM85/LM96000? */
+ data->tmm = lm85_read_value(client, LM85_REG_TACHO_MON_MODE);
Yes, please restrict to the chips which have this register. SMBus
access isn't cheap.
+
data->alarms = lm85_read_value(client, LM85_REG_ALARM1);
if (data->type == emc6d100) {
@@ -1480,7 +1538,7 @@ static struct lm85_data *lm85_update_dev
data->autofan[i].config =
lm85_read_value(client, LM85_REG_AFAN_CONFIG(i));
val = lm85_read_value(client, LM85_REG_AFAN_RANGE(i));
- data->pwm_freq[i] = val & 0x07;
+ data->pwm_freq[i] = val & 0x0f;
You could instead do:
data->pwm_freq[i] = val & (data->type == lm96000 ? 0x0f : 0x07);

That way, you guarantee that the value is within the correct bounds for
the pwm frequency map, so you can keep the original (fast) algorithm in
FREQ_FROM_REG (just drop the useless masking there.)
data->zone[i].range = val >> 4;
data->autofan[i].min_pwm =
lm85_read_value(client, LM85_REG_AFAN_MINPWM(i));
--
Jean Delvare
Herbert Poetzl
2008-10-02 12:59:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jean Delvare
Hi Herbert,
Wrong mailing list, redirecting to the correct one.
this patch adds proper support for LM96000 (at least
the version I could test with) and provides some
'generic' control of the tachometer monitor mode for
lm85/lm96000 pwm control.
Ideally this would be 2 separate patches.
okay
Post by Jean Delvare
please consider for (mainline) inclusion!
TIA,
Herbert
Signed-off-by: Herbert Poetzl <herbert at 13thfloor.at>
diff -NurpP --minimal linux-2.6.27-rc8-khali/Documentation/hwmon/lm85 linux-2.6.27-rc8-khali-lm96k-v0.1/Documentation/hwmon/lm85
--- linux-2.6.27-rc8-khali/Documentation/hwmon/lm85 2008-10-01 19:39:51.000000000 +0200
+++ linux-2.6.27-rc8-khali-lm96k-v0.1/Documentation/hwmon/lm85 2008-10-01 20:39:01.000000000 +0200
-1 PWM always 100% (full on)
-2 Manual control (write to 'pwm#' to set)
+* PWM Tachometer Monitor Mode
You could add that this applies to the LM85 and LM96000 only.
does it?
haven't checked for all other LM85 clones, but
as the basic LM85 supports it, maybe others do
too?

will do some research there, when time permits
Post by Jean Delvare
+
+* pwm#_tmm - controls the monitor mode for pwm#
I'm not convinced that this is the correct name.
well, tachometer_monitor_mode seemed too long, and
tacho_mm was as unintuitive as tmm, while monitor_mode
might be fine, but maybe misleading, see next point
Post by Jean Delvare
These registers mainly affect the fan speed measurement,
not control (thus the name: Tachometer Monitor Mode),
even though mode 2 will have an effect on the PWM duty
cycle as well. So, shouldn't these files be rather named
fan#_tmm?
nope, the TMM is per PWM unit, so while there are
4 fans, they are only controlled by three PWM units
and each unit can set the TMM independantly, so
fan 3 and 4 are controlled with the same TMM bits
Post by Jean Delvare
+
+ Value Meaning <min
+ ------ ---------------------------------------- ------
+ 0 Traditional tach input monitor any
+ 1 Traditional tach input monitor FFFFh
+ 2 Most accurate readings FFFFh
+ 3 Least effect on programmed PWM of Fan FFFFh
+
+In the default setting, you will get false readings when under
+minimum detctable RPM, in all other modes FFFFh.
Mode 0 seems a bit silly to me.
Shouldn't we automatically switch the chip to mode 1
when we find it in mode 0 (and high-frequency PWM isn't
in use)?
I'm fine with auto adjusting the TMM, IMHO mode 2
would be the best choice for defaults, and it doesn't
hurt for high freq pwm to set it, as it is ignored
there ...
Post by Jean Delvare
The National LM85's have two vendor specific configuration
features. Tach. mode and Spinup Control. For more details on these,
see the LM85 datasheet or Application Note AN-1260. These features
Later on, the document says that the tachometer mode isn't
supported by the driver. You should change this, as it is now.
obviously missed that one :)
Post by Jean Delvare
diff -NurpP --minimal linux-2.6.27-rc8-khali/drivers/hwmon/lm85.c linux-2.6.27-rc8-khali-lm96k-v0.1/drivers/hwmon/lm85.c
--- linux-2.6.27-rc8-khali/drivers/hwmon/lm85.c 2008-10-01 19:39:51.000000000 +0200
+++ linux-2.6.27-rc8-khali-lm96k-v0.1/drivers/hwmon/lm85.c 2008-10-01 20:29:25.000000000 +0200
@@ -39,7 +39,8 @@
static const unsigned short normal_i2c[] = { 0x2c, 0x2d, 0x2e, I2C_CLIENT_END };
/* Insmod parameters */
-I2C_CLIENT_INSMOD_6(lm85b, lm85c, adm1027, adt7463, emc6d100, emc6d102);
+I2C_CLIENT_INSMOD_7(lm85b, lm85c, lm96000, adm1027, adt7463, emc6d100,
+ emc6d102);
/* The LM85 registers */
@@ -67,6 +68,7 @@ I2C_CLIENT_INSMOD_6(lm85b, lm85c, adm102
#define LM85_VERSTEP_GENERIC 0x60
#define LM85_VERSTEP_LM85C 0x60
#define LM85_VERSTEP_LM85B 0x62
+#define LM85_VERSTEP_LM96000 0x69
What about 0x68?
We've seen LM96000 chips with this device ID already,
so we should support it.
I'm fine with adding that too, but I do not have
any hardware to test this on, all LM96000 I have
use the 0x69 id, but we might consider masking
off the lower 3 bits, as they are used for version
stepping only (On LM96000 that is)
Post by Jean Delvare
#define LM85_VERSTEP_ADM1027 0x60
#define LM85_VERSTEP_ADT7463 0x62
#define LM85_VERSTEP_ADT7463C 0x6A
@@ -91,6 +93,8 @@ I2C_CLIENT_INSMOD_6(lm85b, lm85c, adm102
#define LM85_REG_AFAN_HYST1 0x6d
#define LM85_REG_AFAN_HYST2 0x6e
+#define LM85_REG_TACHO_MON_MODE 0x74
+
#define ADM1027_REG_EXTEND_ADC1 0x76
#define ADM1027_REG_EXTEND_ADC2 0x77
@@ -185,11 +189,16 @@ static int RANGE_TO_REG(int range)
#define RANGE_FROM_REG(val) lm85_range_map[(val) & 0x0f]
/* These are the PWM frequency encodings */
-static const int lm85_freq_map[8] = { /* 1 Hz */
- 10, 15, 23, 30, 38, 47, 62, 94
Note: this 62 should actually be 61, as you did for the LM96000. I've
fixed it in my code.
okay
Post by Jean Delvare
+static const int lm85_freq_map[] = { /* 1 Hz */
+ 10, 15, 23, 30, 38, 47, 62, 94, 0
};
-static const int adm1027_freq_map[8] = { /* 1 Hz */
- 11, 15, 22, 29, 35, 44, 59, 88
+static const int lm96000_freq_map[] = { /* 1 Hz */
+ 10, 15, 23, 30, 38, 47, 61, 94,
+ 22500, 24000, 25700, 25700,
+ 27700, 27700, 30000, 30000, 0
+};
+static const int adm1027_freq_map[] = { /* 1 Hz */
+ 11, 15, 22, 29, 35, 44, 59, 88, 0
};
static int FREQ_TO_REG(const int *map, int freq)
@@ -197,7 +206,7 @@ static int FREQ_TO_REG(const int *map, i
int i;
/* Find the closest match */
- for (i = 0; i < 7; ++i)
+ for (i = 0; map[i + 1]; i++)
if (freq <= (map[i] + map[i + 1]) / 2)
break;
return i;
@@ -205,7 +214,13 @@ static int FREQ_TO_REG(const int *map, i
static int FREQ_FROM_REG(const int *map, u8 reg)
{
- return map[reg & 0x07];
Note that the masking wasn't needed, as it already happens in
lm85_update_device().
+ int i;
+
+ for (i = 0; map[i]; i++)
+ if (reg == i)
+ break;
+
+ return map[i];
}
You are replacing an algorithm in constant time (O(1)) by a linear one
(O(N)). This is no good, and can easily be avoided. You simply need to
ensure that the value of "reg" is suitable for the map's size, this can
be done by a simple masking in lm85_update_device().
yes, but we need different masks for the various
devices, will think about something there ...
Post by Jean Delvare
/* Since we can't use strings, I'm abusing these numbers
@@ -304,6 +319,7 @@ struct lm85_data {
u8 temp_ext[3]; /* Decoded values */
u8 in_ext[8]; /* Decoded values */
u8 vid; /* Register value */
+ u8 tmm; /* Register value */
u8 vrm; /* VRM version */
u32 alarms; /* Register encoding, combined */
struct lm85_autofan autofan[3];
@@ -327,6 +343,7 @@ static const struct i2c_device_id lm85_i
{ "lm85", any_chip },
{ "lm85b", lm85b },
{ "lm85c", lm85c },
+ { "lm96000", lm96000 },
{ "emc6d100", emc6d100 },
{ "emc6d101", emc6d100 },
{ "emc6d102", emc6d102 },
@@ -567,7 +584,31 @@ static ssize_t set_pwm_freq(struct devic
data->pwm_freq[nr] = FREQ_TO_REG(data->freq_map, val);
lm85_write_value(client, LM85_REG_AFAN_RANGE(nr),
(data->zone[nr].range << 4)
- | data->pwm_freq[nr]);
+ | (data->pwm_freq[nr] & 0x0f));
Useless masking.
+ mutex_unlock(&data->update_lock);
+ return count;
+}
+
+static ssize_t show_pwm_tmm(struct device *dev,
+ struct device_attribute *attr, char *buf)
+{
+ int nr = to_sensor_dev_attr(attr)->index;
+ struct lm85_data *data = lm85_update_device(dev);
+ return sprintf(buf, "%d\n", (data->tmm >> (2*nr)) & 3);
+}
+
+static ssize_t set_pwm_tmm(struct device *dev,
+ struct device_attribute *attr, const char *buf, size_t count)
+{
+ int nr = to_sensor_dev_attr(attr)->index;
+ struct i2c_client *client = to_i2c_client(dev);
+ struct lm85_data *data = i2c_get_clientdata(client);
+ long val = simple_strtol(buf, NULL, 10);
+ int mask = 3 << (2*nr);
You should reject invalid values at this point.
BTW, the datasheet says that only mode 0 is valid for high frequency
PWM modes. So I guess that the driver should enforce that, by forcing
mode 0 and preventing non-zero values from being written when a high
frequency is selected?
my tests showed that it doesn't matter what is written
there when in high-freq mode, so I think we have two
options here, each with their own advantage/disadvantage

1) set tmm to 0 when in high-freq mode
advantages:
- tmm will show the effective mode
disadvantages:
- tmm will changed on low->high(->low)
- additional code in freq settings

2) handle tmm regardless of frequency
advantages:
- tmm will keep the setting when changing
low->high->low
- no extra code required
disadvantages:
- tmm will show wrong values in high-freq mode

just let me know what you prefer
Post by Jean Delvare
+ mutex_lock(&data->update_lock);
+ data->tmm = (data->tmm & ~mask) | ((val & 3) << (2*nr));
+ lm85_write_value(client, LM85_REG_TACHO_MON_MODE, data->tmm);
mutex_unlock(&data->update_lock);
return count;
}
@@ -578,7 +619,9 @@ static SENSOR_DEVICE_ATTR(pwm##offset, S
static SENSOR_DEVICE_ATTR(pwm##offset##_enable, S_IRUGO | S_IWUSR, \
show_pwm_enable, set_pwm_enable, offset - 1); \
static SENSOR_DEVICE_ATTR(pwm##offset##_freq, S_IRUGO | S_IWUSR, \
- show_pwm_freq, set_pwm_freq, offset - 1)
+ show_pwm_freq, set_pwm_freq, offset - 1); \
+static SENSOR_DEVICE_ATTR(pwm##offset##_tmm, S_IRUGO | S_IWUSR, \
+ show_pwm_tmm, set_pwm_tmm, offset - 1)
show_pwm_reg(1);
@@ -886,7 +929,7 @@ static ssize_t set_temp_auto_temp_min(st
TEMP_FROM_REG(data->zone[nr].limit));
lm85_write_value(client, LM85_REG_AFAN_RANGE(nr),
((data->zone[nr].range & 0x0f) << 4)
- | (data->pwm_freq[nr] & 0x07));
+ | (data->pwm_freq[nr] & 0x0f));
You might as well drop the masking altogether, it's useless.
okay, I'm fine with that, will solve the
O(1) problem above too
Post by Jean Delvare
/* Update temp_auto_hyst and temp_auto_off */
data->zone[nr].hyst = HYST_TO_REG(TEMP_FROM_REG(
@@ -929,7 +972,7 @@ static ssize_t set_temp_auto_temp_max(st
val - min);
lm85_write_value(client, LM85_REG_AFAN_RANGE(nr),
((data->zone[nr].range & 0x0f) << 4)
- | (data->pwm_freq[nr] & 0x07));
+ | (data->pwm_freq[nr] & 0x0f));
Same here.
mutex_unlock(&data->update_lock);
return count;
}
@@ -999,6 +1042,9 @@ static struct attribute *lm85_attributes
&sensor_dev_attr_pwm1_freq.dev_attr.attr,
&sensor_dev_attr_pwm2_freq.dev_attr.attr,
&sensor_dev_attr_pwm3_freq.dev_attr.attr,
+ &sensor_dev_attr_pwm1_tmm.dev_attr.attr,
+ &sensor_dev_attr_pwm2_tmm.dev_attr.attr,
+ &sensor_dev_attr_pwm3_tmm.dev_attr.attr,
&sensor_dev_attr_in0_input.dev_attr.attr,
&sensor_dev_attr_in1_input.dev_attr.attr,
@@ -1145,6 +1191,9 @@ static int lm85_detect(struct i2c_client
kind = lm85b;
break;
+ kind = lm96000;
+ break;
}
} else if (company == LM85_COMPANY_ANALOG_DEV) {
switch (verstep) {
@@ -1193,6 +1242,9 @@ static int lm85_detect(struct i2c_client
type_name = "lm85c";
break;
+ type_name = "lm96000";
+ break;
type_name = "adm1027";
break;
@@ -1237,6 +1289,9 @@ static int lm85_probe(struct i2c_client
data->freq_map = adm1027_freq_map;
break;
+ data->freq_map = lm96000_freq_map;
+ break;
data->freq_map = lm85_freq_map;
}
@@ -1401,6 +1456,9 @@ static struct lm85_data *lm85_update_dev
lm85_read_value(client, LM85_REG_PWM(i));
}
+ /* maybe restrict to LM85/LM96000? */
+ data->tmm = lm85_read_value(client, LM85_REG_TACHO_MON_MODE);
Yes, please restrict to the chips which have this register. SMBus
access isn't cheap.
see research :)
Post by Jean Delvare
+
data->alarms = lm85_read_value(client, LM85_REG_ALARM1);
if (data->type == emc6d100) {
@@ -1480,7 +1538,7 @@ static struct lm85_data *lm85_update_dev
data->autofan[i].config =
lm85_read_value(client, LM85_REG_AFAN_CONFIG(i));
val = lm85_read_value(client, LM85_REG_AFAN_RANGE(i));
- data->pwm_freq[i] = val & 0x07;
+ data->pwm_freq[i] = val & 0x0f;
data->pwm_freq[i] = val & (data->type == lm96000 ? 0x0f : 0x07);
That way, you guarantee that the value is within the correct bounds for
the pwm frequency map, so you can keep the original (fast) algorithm in
FREQ_FROM_REG (just drop the useless masking there.)
if possible, I'd rather avoid that, because such
inline conditions get easily out of sync or cause
very strange issues when the tables are extended

I'd prefer to change the table layout once again
to contain the table length as first argument if
the limiting is required at all

best,
Herbert
Post by Jean Delvare
data->zone[i].range = val >> 4;
data->autofan[i].min_pwm =
lm85_read_value(client, LM85_REG_AFAN_MINPWM(i));
--
Jean Delvare
Jean Delvare
2008-10-02 15:24:47 UTC
Permalink
Hi Herbert,
Post by Herbert Poetzl
Post by Jean Delvare
diff -NurpP --minimal linux-2.6.27-rc8-khali/Documentation/hwmon/lm85 linux-2.6.27-rc8-khali-lm96k-v0.1/Documentation/hwmon/lm85
--- linux-2.6.27-rc8-khali/Documentation/hwmon/lm85 2008-10-01 19:39:51.000000000 +0200
+++ linux-2.6.27-rc8-khali-lm96k-v0.1/Documentation/hwmon/lm85 2008-10-01 20:39:01.000000000 +0200
-1 PWM always 100% (full on)
-2 Manual control (write to 'pwm#' to set)
+* PWM Tachometer Monitor Mode
You could add that this applies to the LM85 and LM96000 only.
does it?
haven't checked for all other LM85 clones, but
as the basic LM85 supports it, maybe others do
too?
will do some research there, when time permits
At least the EMC6D102 has different registers (0x90-0x93) for the same
purpose, and no registers 0x74-0x76.
Post by Herbert Poetzl
Post by Jean Delvare
+
+* pwm#_tmm - controls the monitor mode for pwm#
I'm not convinced that this is the correct name.
well, tachometer_monitor_mode seemed too long, and
tacho_mm was as unintuitive as tmm, while monitor_mode
might be fine, but maybe misleading, see next point
I have no problem with "tmm". Users will have to read the documentation
to find out what to write there anyway.
Post by Herbert Poetzl
Post by Jean Delvare
These registers mainly affect the fan speed measurement,
not control (thus the name: Tachometer Monitor Mode),
even though mode 2 will have an effect on the PWM duty
cycle as well. So, shouldn't these files be rather named
fan#_tmm?
nope, the TMM is per PWM unit, so while there are
4 fans, they are only controlled by three PWM units
and each unit can set the TMM independantly, so
fan 3 and 4 are controlled with the same TMM bits
Well, it's a bit more complex than that. TMM assumes that the
connection between tachometers and PWM outputs is known. So TMM is
actually per {PWM unit and all tachometers for fans controlled by it},
which admittedly isn't that easy to express in a file name ;)

But I won't argue anyway. The name is not a standard one so I don't
want to spend too much time discussing it.
Post by Herbert Poetzl
Post by Jean Delvare
+
+ Value Meaning <min
+ ------ ---------------------------------------- ------
+ 0 Traditional tach input monitor any
+ 1 Traditional tach input monitor FFFFh
+ 2 Most accurate readings FFFFh
+ 3 Least effect on programmed PWM of Fan FFFFh
+
+In the default setting, you will get false readings when under
+minimum detctable RPM, in all other modes FFFFh.
Mode 0 seems a bit silly to me.
Shouldn't we automatically switch the chip to mode 1
when we find it in mode 0 (and high-frequency PWM isn't
in use)?
I'm fine with auto adjusting the TMM, IMHO mode 2
would be the best choice for defaults, and it doesn't
hurt for high freq pwm to set it, as it is ignored
there ...
The problem is that modes 2 and 3 require that the connections between
the PWM and tachometers are as expected by the chip. Unfortunately
there is no guarantee that the motherboard manufacturers will respect
that.

Also, when the connections are correct, there is a choice to make
between mode 2 (most accurate speed values) and mode 3 (better speed
control). Only the users know what they prefer for their own setup. Not
that it seems to make too much of a difference in practice though.
Post by Herbert Poetzl
Post by Jean Delvare
@@ -67,6 +68,7 @@ I2C_CLIENT_INSMOD_6(lm85b, lm85c, adm102
#define LM85_VERSTEP_GENERIC 0x60
#define LM85_VERSTEP_LM85C 0x60
#define LM85_VERSTEP_LM85B 0x62
+#define LM85_VERSTEP_LM96000 0x69
What about 0x68?
We've seen LM96000 chips with this device ID already,
so we should support it.
I'm fine with adding that too, but I do not have
any hardware to test this on, all LM96000 I have
use the 0x69 id, but we might consider masking
off the lower 3 bits, as they are used for version
stepping only (On LM96000 that is)
This makes sense. If National Semiconductor ever produces a chip with,
say, ID 0x6a, that would either be the next iteration of the LM96000,
or hopefully a backwards-compatible chip.
Post by Herbert Poetzl
Post by Jean Delvare
+static ssize_t set_pwm_tmm(struct device *dev,
+ struct device_attribute *attr, const char *buf, size_t count)
+{
+ int nr = to_sensor_dev_attr(attr)->index;
+ struct i2c_client *client = to_i2c_client(dev);
+ struct lm85_data *data = i2c_get_clientdata(client);
+ long val = simple_strtol(buf, NULL, 10);
+ int mask = 3 << (2*nr);
You should reject invalid values at this point.
BTW, the datasheet says that only mode 0 is valid for high frequency
PWM modes. So I guess that the driver should enforce that, by forcing
mode 0 and preventing non-zero values from being written when a high
frequency is selected?
my tests showed that it doesn't matter what is written
there when in high-freq mode, so I think we have two
options here, each with their own advantage/disadvantage
1) set tmm to 0 when in high-freq mode
- tmm will show the effective mode
- tmm will changed on low->high(->low)
- additional code in freq settings
2) handle tmm regardless of frequency
- tmm will keep the setting when changing
low->high->low
- no extra code required
- tmm will show wrong values in high-freq mode
just let me know what you prefer
Or option 3: in show_pwm_tmm() check if high-freq mode, if yes return
0, if no return the value of the TMM register. That way we return the
correct value all the time. Or am I missing some issue this approach
would have?
Post by Herbert Poetzl
Post by Jean Delvare
@@ -886,7 +929,7 @@ static ssize_t set_temp_auto_temp_min(st
TEMP_FROM_REG(data->zone[nr].limit));
lm85_write_value(client, LM85_REG_AFAN_RANGE(nr),
((data->zone[nr].range & 0x0f) << 4)
- | (data->pwm_freq[nr] & 0x07));
+ | (data->pwm_freq[nr] & 0x0f));
You might as well drop the masking altogether, it's useless.
okay, I'm fine with that, will solve the
O(1) problem above too
I don't think this is related to the problem in question. The masking
was useless even before your patch. data->pwm_freq[nr] is already
masked when reading it from the register or from the user input, so
masking it again each time we use is a no-op.
Post by Herbert Poetzl
Post by Jean Delvare
@@ -1480,7 +1538,7 @@ static struct lm85_data *lm85_update_dev
data->autofan[i].config =
lm85_read_value(client, LM85_REG_AFAN_CONFIG(i));
val = lm85_read_value(client, LM85_REG_AFAN_RANGE(i));
- data->pwm_freq[i] = val & 0x07;
+ data->pwm_freq[i] = val & 0x0f;
data->pwm_freq[i] = val & (data->type == lm96000 ? 0x0f : 0x07);
That way, you guarantee that the value is within the correct bounds for
the pwm frequency map, so you can keep the original (fast) algorithm in
FREQ_FROM_REG (just drop the useless masking there.)
if possible, I'd rather avoid that, because such
inline conditions get easily out of sync or cause
very strange issues when the tables are extended
Still, this is the only technically correct way to do it. Otherwise you
are carrying data bits which may not make sense for a given chip type.
And I fail to see how this could go out-of-sync: you know how many
frequencies each chip type support, and this isn't going to change.

If you think it's safer, you can add a pwm_freq_mask field to struct
lm85_data and initialize it at the same time you initialize
data->freq_map.
Post by Herbert Poetzl
I'd prefer to change the table layout once again
to contain the table length as first argument if
the limiting is required at all
Either that, or keep the tables in their original form and add either
data->pwm_freq_mask or data->freq_map_size. The latter option has the
advantage that you can share the LM85 and LM96000 frequency tables.
--
Jean Delvare
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